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Kinugawa CT26 High Flow Kits

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Kinugawa CT26 High Flow Kits

Posted on 12 April 2012 by admin

Kinugawa CT26 Upgrade After a few requests I have been looking into Kinugawa’s range of Turbos and the high flow kits they offer for the CT26

First off looking at these kits, they do seem reasonably priced for upgrading your stock CT26 to hold a bit more boost, although they don’t mention the fact that you will need to have your cartridge machined out to support the larger wheel, at the same time it would also be wise to have a rebuild and balance, after all there is no point in running 16psi on a high flow if your going to be pissing oil out of your seals.

Kinugawa mainly sell though eBay retailers and the title mentions a Garrett 60-1 wheel. Further looking into the kit, the supplied wheel is only listed as 60-1 wheel, and inspect the wheel closer you can see they have removed portions off the side of the wheel for balancing, which may I add high end manufactures have never been know to do, maybe a stock turbo but never with a quality after-market wheel have I seen these techniques used, all the big names such as KKK, Garrett & Holset machine small amounts off the bottom of the wheel so it will no affect its circumference. If you compare their photo of a stock wheel and Kinugawa wheel own you can tell that there wheel is cast not forged or billet. Adding together a cast wheel with what appears to be poor balancing techniques I would not trust this turbo spinning at 200,000rpm, if their wheel were to shatter you’re pretty much pointing a shotgun into your intake system.

The initial price of the kit is $200 for a compressor wheel and housing, a rebuild and balance will set you back around $450 and the machining will also cost around $100 odd dollars bring the grand total to $750~$800. I personally would not recommend this option, it does not seem worth the risk. If you want to High Flow a CT26 do it right and spend an extra $200 to have a Proper wheel fitted and I would also use a 57 trim wheel as EMS have done there own research proving it to be the best option of a high flow, or just upgrade the whole turbo depending on your power goals.


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Toyota CT15B Turbo

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Toyota CT15B Turbo

Posted on 21 January 2012 by admin

CT15B-Turbocharger The CT15b Turbo is one of Toyota’s well engineered blow dryers capable of providing 400hp, It was designed purely for 1jzgte to eliminate the twin turbo setup without loosing response or power but it also improved the maximum torque by about 4% and is 25% more efficient than ct12 setups.

A stock CT15B is rated at 400hp / 225KW and once high flowed it can snap out 450hp / 270kw, the stock unit has a max boost of 16 – 17psi. It is common practice to see the CT15B high-flowed, one option is to use a 20G compressor and bore the comp cover to suit, this will give you he 50 -70hp increase and as the 20g compressor wheel is a better mapped for volumetric efficiency you will have one super responsive turbocharger.

It uses Toyota’s own flanges on the exhaust housing inlet and their 4 bolt rectangular outlet and incorporated a internal waste gate that will open a 6-8 psi depending on the year and model of car. Its not a twin entry and 90% if the CT15s run ceramic technology and are both water and oil cooled. Looking at the dimensions of the compressor and turbine wheels it is very similar to the CT20b and it probably is one of the best turbochargers Toyota has developed.

RRP $1200 ($300 Secondhand)

Tech Specs

Rated HP: 400/strong>

Compressor Side Turbine
Wheel Diameter
Inducer Exducer Trim A/R Wheel Diam Trim A/R
46mm 65mm 50 ? 60mm 64 ??

 

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Toyota CT20b Turbo

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Toyota CT20b Turbo

Posted on 29 November 2011 by admin

ct20b turbo The CT20b is ceramic twin entry turbocharger that is one of the most sought after upgrades for the 3S-GTE engines in MR2’s and Celica’s, it came standard on all GEN III 3S-GTE motors and can usually be found from wreckers for around $800 used. The CT20b is designed by Toyota and manufactured by Hitachi which limits the amount of people who are able to work on them, If you are looking to rebuild a CT20b there is not much point unless you are doing a high flow as the re-builder will generally replace the ceramic wheel and shaft with steel ones, and by removing the lighter components you taking away what makes it spool faster.

The CT20b has a working pressure of 11.9 – 16.7psi which is very similar to the CT26 but still higher, the main advantage of using a CT20b over the CT26 is that the CT26 has a steel shaft and wheel where are the CT20b uses ceramic. Due to a revised and more efficient compressor wheel the CT20B will spool slightly slower but has more top end gains and although the ceramic is lighter and spools faster it is severely weaker than steel. The CT20b will hold boost right through to red line where as the CT26 starts to drop off at about 5500rpm, Max boost on a CT20b is 18-19psi but that is well outside of the efficiency range of the turbo and being over its limits it increases the chance of breaking the wheel and snapping the shaft. The Fensport website actually publish that the series one of the CT20b all have the common problem that the turbine shaft is prone to cracking.

The CT20b is rated at 400hp which is close to 280-300 rwhp so all in all it’s a excellent bolt on upgrade as 15-16 psi is approximately a 37 percent power increase over stock which is perfect for those who prefer a mildly worked street-able car. But if you are planning on doing some extensive upgrades like ECU and cams then I would not recommend it due to the fact that the CT20b technology is 15 – 20 years old now and if your going to pay near $800 you might as well get something a bit bigger.

RRP $800

Tech Specs

Compressor Side Turbine
Wheel Diameter
Inducer Exducer Trim A/R Wheel Diam Trim A/R
48mm 62mm ?? ?? 59.8mm ?? ??

 

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Toyota’s CT26 Turbocharger

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Toyota’s CT26 Turbocharger

Posted on 01 September 2010 by admin

CT26-TURBOCHARGERI have to say that the CT26 is one of the most misunderstood turbochargers in the history of turbos, it is brain teaser to figure out but is not as complicated as a rubix cube.

Most people steer clear of them because they run out of puff and just become a hair dryer after 15 psi and pump out nothing but hot air, But for Toyota’s complete in house design it’s not such a bad Turbocharger seeming how it will shit 300hp up the wall easy, even compared to the Disco Potato. As far as reliability goes it will out last and engine it looked after and common failure is popping a oil seal which is a quick fix anyway.   There are three different types of the CT26, there is CT26 from the Toyota Supra, Cressida and Soarer which has a steel wheel, is single entry, has different mounts for the wastegate, Then there is the CT26-a from the MR2 and Celica GT4 3SGTE engines know as the twin entry. First of all twin entry does not mean that the Compressor wheel has two sets of blades because thats normal, it mean the tubing inlet flange is split down the middle, why? so the gas flows across the rear of the Turbine wheel evenly.

While not being the most effective means of spooling, it does however keep the wheel temp a bit lower, which will help if you own a Import 2nd GEN 3SGTE as some had ceramic wheels. Factory wastegate for 89-93 is 8.5psi to 10psi, these are water and oil cooled and the shaft float in a coat of oil in the sleeve bearings.

Spooling is slightly better on the Supra’s CT26 as the single entry housing has a better design, but if you own the CT26a with a ceramic wheel spooling is also good with a decrease of lag, only issue how ever is how do you feel about a shattering wheel at 140,000rpm, not friendly, all variations of the CT26 have and internal wastegate , dump pipes are also different patterns and watch out for the ct26′s being sold cheap on E-bay as they list MR2 and Celica but turns out the only fit supra’s and land cruiser.

 

As far as upgrade goes for more top end boost clip the exhaust wheel but you will sacrifice a bit down low, and if you wish for that extra puff above 15psi a common mod is to fit Garrett T04e compressor wheel and re-bore the comp cover to end that struggle after 6000rpm (who seriously goes that hard all day long anyway), it’s not as good as a T4 but you will see a nice gain up to 16-18psi max, some people go a higher trim but this has had bad experience with shaft snapping and is also dyno proven to be more lag yetmore efficant by 3% for the 60trim. For anyone who thinks the ct26 isn’t that great, think of any other 2.0 twin cam engine like the 3SGTE that was produced in early 1990s erra that runs just as good, only other car being a SR20 which was garrets turbo anyway, So at the end of the day if you want to run up to 15psi keep your CT26, if you want 15-18psi High flow it with a Garrett T4 wheel, or for up to 15psi with a quicker spool get a CT20B, And when you are ready to upgrade to a larger turbo you would want to get some internal work done and a programmable ECU, cus there’s been plenty of engine’s blow to a CT26 and high boost.

CT26a RRP: $350 – $800

Tech Specs

Compressor Side

Turbine

Wheel Diameter

Inducer

Exducer

Trim

A/R

Wheel Diam

Trim

A/R

??mm

??mm

57

??

??

??

0.49

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